‘Humument’ with Hippocrates

On Tuesday, I ran my annual poetry workshop for the Medical Humanities students at Imperial College London, led by Giskin Day. For part of the workshop, we applied the techniques used in Tom Phillips’ classic art book, ‘A Humument,’ to the Hippocratic Oath. I provided students with four versions of the Oath: a translation of the original, a version for nurses called the ‘Florence Nightingale Pledge,’ a modern version written in the 70s, and the ‘Affirmation’ that Imperial College London medical students will take once they graduate.

I’ve written previously (there and also here) about the amazing adaptability and resonance of applying ‘A Humument’ to Medical Humanities workshops. Students respond with an overwhelmingly positive level of enthusiasm to cutting out paper, marking up the texts, and teasing out words and phrases relevant to their experiences. They’ve given me permission to post their works below – and this was from about twenty minutes’ worth of ‘treatment’ time! I’ve selected some of the most colourful, but I want to thank all of the students for their marvellous contributions.

Tom Phillips would, I hope, be proud of the range of styles, and also the humour here:

Stunning styles.

Stunning styles.

Hilarious? Sad? Both?

Hilarious? Sad? Both?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Each student came up with her (or his) own metaphorical style and approach. The artwork some of them did in just a fifteen or twenty minutes!

The doctor.

The doctor.

Seeing through the wall.

Seeing through the wall.

 

Ships at sea.

Ships at sea.

It’s not only impressive, but incredibly heartening, to see which words students chose:

Colour-blocking.

Colour-blocking.

Lab coat and blood (intended). Green field of poppies (interpreted).

Lab coat and blood (intended). Green field of poppies (interpreted).

A 'wordle'.

A ‘wordle’.

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